Fuck Buttons

Fuck Buttons
Courtesy of Judy Miller

Fuck Buttons’ Myspace

April 20 (better known as 4/20) has a polarizing meaning depending on which of the two main groups who celebrate the holiday you fall into. The day can represent free love, peace and hash to all those who believe in that sort of stuff. Or it can represent Hitler’s birthday, repression and death to all those who believe in that sort of stuff. To the few people who celebrate both meanings, who retain elements of both hippies and neo-Nazis, I give you your new favorite band: Fuck Buttons.

Fuck Buttons are a nihilistic experimental group whose greatest claim to fame so far has been the droning techno raves they put on in the U.K. underground during after-hours. After developing somewhat of a cult following, the band moved to more progressive styles of recordable instrumental music, including their newest EP, Street Horrrsing.

Made up of Andrew Hung and Benjamin John Power, the English duo combines dreamy synths with pulsating bass to give the listener a truly unique sonic experience. Like 4/20, Fuck Buttons takes equal parts of the joy of psychadelia and dread of dictatorships. Pitchfork magazine described their music’s tone as “something like the sun rising over the ocean … then going supernova.”

Take “Bright Tomorrow.” The song starts with one marching drum and quiet pianos and builds over two minutes to a crescendo of electronica. At the two-and-a-half-minute mark the song is thrown into a sea of chaos, with overloud guitars and sonic effects so distorted you don’t know if the instrument is from this planet anymore. A person starts screaming in the background of the song, giving the entire song an even eerier feel. The song then strips itself of overcomplicated layers and returns back to the beating of a single drum. “Bright Tomorrow” is like heading into a battlezone and coming out as the only one left alive.

Fuck Buttons takes tribal rhythm, drones, and synths to a level usually reserved for techno legends that have been around for 20 years. But these prodigy kids have only been at work for four years, and at the rate they’re going, they’re likely to have a long career heating up dancefloors and headphones for many bright tomorrows to come.

—By Asst Entertainment Editor Geoff Schorkopf

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